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20131202
20131210
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. >> please respect our way of life, respect our religion. it makes no sense to put a monetary value on something that is so religious to a people. >> the ngo representing tribal rights, survival international, is defending the hope because -- hopi cause in france. it says such sales are shameful. >> we propose a very narrow definition of what should not be sold. not every art object belonging to primitive tribes, not all religious objects. here, the tribe sees the masks as almost alive. they use them. they belong to the tribe collectively. >> among activists supporting the hopi cause is robert redford , who says any auction of the masks is a criminal gesture. >> rio de janeiro has held its first mass gay wedding. 100 couples said i do on sunday. some couples wore traditional attire, others jeans. they were all united in their cheer that erupted when the judge announced them married. us in the from newsroom. we will have more headlines coming up in just over 15 minutes. >> in football, monaco have moved into second in the french league after a narrow win. monaco stays 2 points in tim
of culture, religion, and gender. investors from overseas see opportunities among the growing middle class, but millions live in poverty. many wonder what's next for india. find out this week here on "newsline." >>> japan doesn't think the world trade talks are over. in fact, it thinks it needs a different way to approach the obstacles. ron madison has been following the story, ron? >> that's right. there are several areas where compromise has been pretty elusive, gene, so at the world trade talks under way in indonesia, japan is asking developing and emerging economies to take a flexible approach to save the deadlocked doha round of free trade negotiations. a four-day ministerial session of the world trade organization is taking place in bali. delegates are now focusing on three issues, including the simplification of customs procedures over which industrialized and developing countries are less divided. japanese representative said negotiators have come very close to success. that appeared to be almost unattainable three months ago. >> translator: the key members could make critical deci
prefer it to stay as a museum. and that is better. >> debate about the role of religion in a run-up of a test to a highly charged election. kicking off next march with local polls. the controversial plans to be a way for the turkish government to gain more support from ultraconservative muslim voters. >> one of the reasons why they want the sofia to become a mosque is it would be another blow to turkish secularism. two churches and other parts of turke
of god" in the catholic religion. it was a means of going inside of yourself to find the strength within to deal with the outside world. one of my mentors was bill kunseler. there was one scene he told me about when he was in birmingham where he was representing dr. martin luther king. and they had come from a demonstration or rally, and king had been told that there were men looking to kill him that night. and they drove up to a house, and bill and king were staying in the house together with a group of other people. bill told the story that people were petrified that night. i mean, they thought that the house was going to be bombed, and they darkened the house so there were no lights at all. and he was afraid for his life. and king must have sensed this fear in the room. and he walked over to a piano and started to play "this little light of mine," and the whole group just started to sing this song, and they sang songs all through the night. and bill said at the end of this time, it was like there was nothing to be afraid of. i mean, he himself, a non-religious person, was moved by thi
and religion. and what the u.s. wanted for a long time was not a devaluation of the dollar, but a revaluation of other currencies. well, this was politically and economically difficult, and unacceptable for other countries, so we were in a logjam. we were really in a block that we didn't know how to get out of. schoumacher: the united states pressured foreign central banks to retain their dollars. the government also tried to restrict the amount of money invested or spent overseas, but to little avail. none of these acts could halt the growing dollar glut, nor convince currency speculators that the dollar would not be devalued. speculators dumped billions worth of dollars on the foreign exchange markets. by the time richard nixon assumed the presidency, the system so carefully crafted at brettonoods was on the verge of collapse. dr. marina von neuman whitman, former economic advisor to president nixon. the overall system needed to be reformed and overhauled, and that in order to set the stage for that -- in order almost to get other countries' attention and force them to focus on the need to
, the religion of a people. from my perspective, the economy of a group is one of the most powerful determinants of human behavior. keach: to archaeologists, all economies fall somewhere on a spectrum from simple to complex. in a simple economy, people grow or gather all the food they eat. they make all the things they use. households in such simple economies are almost completely self-sufficient. at the other end of the spectrum are highly complex economies in which people specialize in one particular job, like these shoe salesmen in morocco. specialization means people are no longer self-sufficient, but depend on each other. the shoe salesmen are dependent on the shoemakers, and the shoemakers are dependent on the tanners, and so on. this dependence on others makes society in general more complex, so specialization is a measure of society's overall complexity. archaeologists find evidence of specialization everywhere -- in the buildings and sculpture of ancient cities, and in crafts like elegant jade earrings, decorated pottery and even skulls with jade inlays in their teeth. these craft items
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6